Our Pilot Brews
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Although we are not up and running, we do have a solid stable of brews that we are working to bring to market as soon as we find permanent brewing space.  For the time being we can be contacted, liked and/or followed on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter.  We'd love to hear from you.  If you'd like to join our mailing list, click here.  We'll keep you up to speed on our progress.  

Alfie Byrne (Irish Stout): Your first taste of this dark-as-a-Dublin-midnight stout whooshes you back to the boisterous streets of the Irish capital once presided over by Lord Mayor Byrne. Your next few sips hint at coffee and chocolate and vanilla, but those flavors aren’t add-ons—they’re there due to the brewer’s skill at coaxing complexity out of the grain, hops, and yeast.

 

Amos (English bitter): Tradition and resolve—good conversation—maybe a mention of Her Majesty will fit right in with this veddy British ale. Lots of U.K. malt and noble hops lend a decidedly across-the-pond feel to this one.

  

Arthur (West India porter): This version of “Uncle Arthur’s” original 1801 stout porter will get your Irish up with the classic notes of dark and darker malt. The creamy head will tip you off to Arthur’s style.

Bernie (New England IPA): A citrusy hop/pine party that’s ALL IN with the fruit, the hops, and the yeast. A little hazy, a little funky, and singularly itself—that’s Bernie.  

Dean (NEIPA) – Gobs of hops, creamy body, in-your-face American and New Zealand hops.  Pretty hazy and assertive but your new U.S./Kiwi friend will talk your ear off and then invite you over for dinner.

Diego (Belgian porter): This Belgian porter amped with unrefined Mexican sugar is the wild child of the bunch, painting roasty, bready, toasty pictures on your palate. The mouthfeel is lighter than you’d expect from the dark color and creamy head; the Belgian yeast whispers of a Continental connection.

Diego 2 (American porter):  Diego’s cool American cousin trades the slightly mysterious Belgian yeast profile for a traditional U.S. yeast -- more Yankee ingenuity from oats and wheat add up to a solid American porter flavor.

Epicurus (double IPA with Citra hops): This titan of Greek philosophy believed that the happy person is one who lives simply, seeks only those pleasures that contribute to long-term peace of mind, and seeks to make and keep good friends. Sounds like the perfect environment for sharing Epicurus – the philosophy and the brew – with those you enjoy.

 

Gelb (New England Pale Ale): Hops named Amarillo (yellow/gelb) boost the sunshiny citrus quotient in this hazy NEIPA. Together with the respectable 6.2 ABV, this means a smooth, traditional brew.

 

Gillis (hoppy session ale): Four kinds of hops! Light-bodied! Lower ABV! All add up to an easygoing yet flavorful session ale. The kind of ale that would go great after rolling a few strings of candlepins.

 

Gina C (cream ale): Everything a quintessentially American cream ale should be—light, crisp, not bitter. Kind of like its namesake: It’s hip, easy to like, and you’ll want another.

 

Henri (Belgian strong ale): Named for a favorite Belgian uncle who maintained that the shape of the glass ALWAYS matters. He was right, BTW. Belgian by birth, Belgian in temperament, American by tribute. Clear skies and tail winds always, monsieur.

 

Hume (light dinner ale): Who says session ales are the “newest thing”? A light, spritzy, flavorful charmer based on a recipe from 1911. That’s a long time ago – we did the math.

 

Josef (Kölsch): Similar to a Trappist-style single – definitely dry and with that crisp, sentimental noble-hop experience. Subtly fruity esters from the yeast complete the libation and tip the glass in tribute to Abbot Josef of the last Trappist monastery.

Karl (Kolsch): Karl’s sparkling clarity shows off the best of authentic German grain, traditional Teutonic hops, and adherence to traditional brewing methods. A crisp, light beer sporting a backbone that will have you shouting “Noch eine bier [one more beer], Karl!”

 

Lily (imperial amber): Imperials are dark(er), sweet(ish), definitely bold. Some would say bitter, but let’s call Lily “intense.” A character-full eye-opener you won’t soon forget.

 

Louis (west coast double IPA): Super malt character lends Louis a full body; hop additions during the boil, ferment, and rest ensure a blast of pine, citrus, and mango in your nose as you lift Louis to your lips. A classic west-coast DIPA experience.

 

Machiavelli (raspberry blond ale): This lightly-hopped, pale-cerise blond appeals to realists, lovers of intellectual discourse, and anyone who really just likes a well-made lighter beer energized by a spritz of berry. Not fruity; rather, fruit-adjacent. Yum.   

 

Marley (tropical IPA): Can you still call yourself a New England-style IPA when your hops whisper of the tropics? Marley’s solid 6.1% ABV and medium body say “yes” with its papaya and mango notes. Close your eyes and imagine warm sands, conjure the sound of palm-tree fronds clacking in the breeze, and don’t worry about a thing.

 

McGann (Irish blond): Named as homage to a legendary Emerald Isle publican – this so-called white stout uses oats plus light English malt and traditional hops for a quintessentially Doolin quaff that’s light in color but sturdy as all get-out.

 

Nicolas (American blond with sweet orange peel): An American wheat beer. Definitively NOT an IPA or a typical hefe -- a balanced wheat beer with a citrus backbone that everyone knows, really likes, and deems worthy of a return visit.

 

Sally (cream ale): This cream ale is hopped with Idaho 7, known as the “Golden Hop” or “Lucky 7.” All we know is that it imbues our shy Sally with citrus-forward orange plus smoky tea flavor. No actual oranges or tea were harmed in the making of this beer.

Sigmund (Vienna IPA): Celebrating the sweet, roasty goodness of Vienna malt melded with the best of U.S. West Coast hops.  It might sound contrary and extreme, but remember: Sometimes an IPA is just an IPA.

 

Simone (blackberry saison): The existentialist philosopher de Beauvoir was an early French feminist, an educator, a prolific writer, and was both hailed and reviled during her lifetime. She was Jean-Paul Sartre’s partner for more than 50 years. Imagine the conversations over a few drinks in their house…spicy and prone to make the listener blush.

 

Sparky (west coast IPA): Named for a son of America’s heartland who transplanted himself to the west coast and became the “all-American” artist, Sparky India Pale Ale is hoppy, bitter, citrus-focused, and clear. Did we mention hoppy? Although it was developed two-plus centuries ago in England, IPA has become for some enthusiasts the de facto “all-American” beer.

 

Standish (Belgian herbed single): One taste, one exclamation: “We can make this!” From a far-north excursion emerged Standish, something of a pioneer with its peppery/light Saison yeast and herby additions. Merci, Montreal, for une source d’inspiration!

 

Twain (Belgian tripel): Triple anything and you’ll find more is better. Twain’s full-up with fruity, estery, hoppy, bubbly character. Goes amazingly well with anything you’re eating.

 

Vinnie West Coast IPA: All the new-style left-coast hops you need. All the body, sweetness, and straightforward drinkability you want with more than the typical malt backbone. Say hello to your new friend Vinnie.

Vito (orange blond): One sip and you’ll taste, see, smell, the oranges. Not a harbinger of doom this time, but rather a portent of good times, great beermaking, and maybe a movie-trilogy marathon? 

William (oaked barleywine): Barleywine, for those in the know, is a type of “strong ale” with notes of fruit, toffee, and resiny hops. Letting it rest on oak infuses William with his bigger, deeper, flavors. Not a gulper but a sipper. Thoughtfully.   

 

Willie (French stout): Let’s talk about the bittering agent in this stout – gentian root. Also known as bitterwort or devil’s taint (!), gentian was used to bitter all kinds of beverages in the pre-hop past. Gentian’s known to grow mostly in rough terrain, on the side of hills or mountains. Just like Willie and his farm—tough, tenacious, strong-willed.